AT LEAST ten areas are speeding ahead to vaccinate all over 50s by March 7, figures suggest.

The Government aims to have all those over 50 jabbed by mid-April, at which point several key parts of lockdown will be lifted.

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The areas of England expected to reach all over 50s by the first week of March, based on the current speed of rollout

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The areas of England expected to reach all over 50s by the first week of March, based on the current speed of rollout

However, data suggests some areas could smash that target a month before, the day before the first part of lockdown will be lifted, with pupils set to return to school on March 8.

By that week, more than three-quarters of England is on track to have given “enough first doses” to all over-50s, according to analysis of NHS figures by The Telegraph

Gloucestershire has already administered first doses to 97 per cent of its over 70s population, and 18 per cent of the under 70s.

Keeping up its most recent pace of 37,261 doses a week would mean the county would hit 170,333 first doses for under 70s by March 7.

Devon, North Somerset, Bristol, South Gloucestershire, Cornwall, Suffolk, Staffordshire, Leicestershire and West Yorkshire could also reach a March 7 target, based on recent figures.

Each of those areas have vaccinated at least 94 per cent of their over 70s and 14 per cent of under 70s.

On top of that, partnerships including those covering Cambridgeshire, West Birmingham, Derbyshire and Essex will give out enough first doses for those in their 50s, 60s and beyond in the week ending March 21. 

Meanwhile, other areas are lagging behind and are more likely to reach all those over 50 by the start of April.

Nurse Maggie Clark prepares to administer a dose of the AstraZeneca/Oxford Covid-19 vaccine to a patient at a vaccination centre set up at the Fiveways Islamic Centre and Mosque in Nottingham, February 22

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Nurse Maggie Clark prepares to administer a dose of the AstraZeneca/Oxford Covid-19 vaccine to a patient at a vaccination centre set up at the Fiveways Islamic Centre and Mosque in Nottingham, February 22Credit: AFP or licensors

 

How many vaccines have been given in each nation?

England

  • A total of 14,844,087 people had received a first dose of Covid-19 vaccine up to February 20, according to NHS England.
  • This is the equivalent of 26.4 per cent of the total population of England, and 33.5 per cent of people aged 18 and over.
  • The latest available breakdown for age groups in England is for doses given up to February 14.
  • By this date, an estimated 93.4 per cent of people aged 80 and over had received their first dose, along with 99.3 per cent of people aged 75-79 and 92.3 per cent of people aged 70-74.
  • A total of 94.5 per cent of residents of older adult care homes in England eligible to have their first dose of Covid-19 vaccine had received the jab by February 14, as well as 69 per cent of eligible staff in older adult care homes.

Wales

  • As of February 20, 860,083 people had received their first dose of Covid-19 vaccine, according to Public Health Wales.
  • This is the equivalent of 27.3 per cent of the total population of Wales, and 34.1 per cent of people aged 18 and over.
  • A total of 90.5 per cent of people aged 80 and over had received their first dose, along with 92.5 per cent of people aged 75-79 and 91.9 per centof people aged 70-74.
  • The latest figure for care home residents is 84.4 per cent, for care home workers it is 85.7 per cent, and for the clinically extremely vulnerable aged 16-69 it is 84.2 per cent.

Scotland

  • As of February 21, 1,431,942 people had received their first dose of Covid-19 vaccine, according to the Scottish Government.
  • This is the equivalent of 26.2 per cent of the total population of Scotland, and 32.3 per cent of people aged 18 and over.
  • The proportion of people aged 80 or over to receive a first jab has exceeded the estimated population for this age group, as has the proportion of people aged 75-79.
  • An estimated 96 per cent of people aged 70-74 have had their first dose, along with 80 per cent of people aged 65-69.
  • Some 96 per cent of residents in all care homes have had their first dose. The figure for staff in care homes is 81per cent.

Northern Ireland

  • A total of 446,009 people had received a first dose of Covid-19 vaccine as of February 20, according to the Northern Ireland Department of Health.
  • This is the equivalent of 23.6 per cent of the total population of Northern Ireland, and 30.7 per cent of people aged 18 and over.
  • As of February 15, 94 per cent of people aged 80 and over are estimated to have had their first dose of vaccine, along with 88 per cent of people aged 75-79, 75 per cent of people aged 70-74 and 62 per cent of people aged 65-69.
  • All care homes in Northern Ireland have been visited and offered the first dose of the vaccine.

The latest NHS data – up until February 14 – shows London has not been able to reach one in five people aged over 80.

This is the lowest proportion for any region and compares with 93.4 per cent for the whole of England.

The East London health and care partnership is not likely to give first doses to all those over 50 until the first week of April, the Telegraph reports, which is slower than the rest of the country. 

The east of the capital has jabbed some of the lowest proportions of over 70s (80 per cent) and under 70s (10 per cent) in England.

But a beginning of April target is still ahead of the Government’s mid-April aim, due to the rapid pace of the NHS.

The Health Secretary Matt Hancock had said everyone in the top nine groups — including everyone aged 50 and over and all adults with underlying conditions — will have been offered a vaccine by April 15.

‘Very encouraging’ data from vaccine rollout

It comes as the vaccination programme hit 17.7 million today.

Over a third of adults in Britain have now received a first dose of either the Pfizer or Oxford/AstraZeneca jab.

And the first raft of evidence proving the success of the rollout was published today.

In the first set of vaccine data published, researchers in Scotland found the Oxford jab appeared to reduce a person’s risk of hospital admission by up to 94 per cent – four weeks after the initial dose.

They found people who received the Pfizer vaccine had a reduction in risk of up to 85 per cent between 28 and 34 days after the first dose.

Meanwhile, a separate study from Public Health England (PHE) has found just a single dose of the Pfizer vaccine cuts the chance of hospital admission and death from Covid by more than 75 per cent among the over-80s.

Another PHE study found the Pfizer/BioNTech jab also offered a high degree of protection for younger age groups.

Healthcare workers who had been given a single dose of the jab had at least a 70 per cent lower chance of becoming infected with coronavirus 21 days after vaccination, rising to 85 per cent after a second dose.

Experts have today declared the results – the first evidence to come out of the UK’s jab programme – as “very encouraging”.

It bodes well for the easing of lockdown – the plan for which was published today.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson revealed the roadmap to normality in the Commons this afternoon before a public address tonight.

The continued progress of vaccines – which will be offered to the rest of the general public by the end of July – is one of four measures that will be continuously assessed by No10 to ensure a safe unlocking.

Life will take two years to return to normal but we’ll have to live with Covid as zero cases ‘impossible’, expert warns

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