The UK coronavirus daily death toll has risen by 178, the lowest for over two months.

Another 178 people lost their lives to Covid-19 in the latest 24 hour period, according to official government figures.

However, cases did see a small rise on yesterday and last Monday at 10,641.

This time last week there were 9,765 new infections recorded and yesterday there were 9,834.

Monday last week there were 230 deaths.

The counts tend to be lower on Sundays and Mondays due to a lag in reporting.

The latest hospital death tally from across the UK shows a decline of almost a quarter on last week’s total, with 24 percent less fatalities.

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A London Ambulance worker puts on a protective mask outside the Royal London Hospital

The latest coronavirus case figures show a slight increase on yesterday
(Image: Getty Images)

Meanwhile, the R rate has dipped further below 1 at 0.6 to 0.9 with a daily infection growth rate range of -6% to -3% as of 19 February.

The last time it was this low was in July, prompting Downing Street to begin easing lockdown restrictions.

However, Boris Johnson has warned measures will not be lifted so liberally this time around, with the PM set to reveal his roadmap for opening up England this evening.

Monday's latest UK Covid cases

The figures for Sunday and Monday are generally the lowest due to a weekend lag
(Image: Press Association Images)

As of Sunday, the number of people who have had their first dose of the vaccine stands at 17,723,840.

Brits could be working from home until at least June, Mr Johnson is expected to tell the nation from 7pm.

The Tory leader’s four-step plan would see restrictions eased gradually, with changes every five weeks if the government’s tests are met.

It’s understood he has chosen to proceed with “caution”, so that each stage of the re-opening is ‘irrevocable’ – meaning the country doesn’t have to slide back into lockdown.

But has failed to give reassurance to the millions of workers relying on the furlough scheme to survive during the reopening.

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